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History Lives Here Text

WHAT HO, MY ANCIENTS!

BYAN ANONYMOUS CONTRIBUTOR.

What ho, my Ancients ! Attend me, I pray,

For faro would I sing you a songof today!

The hired man asks, "Where inhell's Dingleville?

And what'sGreiner's solaces-a Bible or pill?"

(Alas! I can't tell him-I wasn'there then,

When Wallin and Greinerwere stalwart young men.)

 

But, Sires, do you heed me andtake it for fact,

The old place is changed like thehead of a tack

That's aimed at by woman, and altered so much

That even it's maker won't know itas such.

(Aye! Leave it to woman to ring in the changes!

Man but proposes it's woman arranges !)

 

The old harbor's gone. The newpier's where they fish from.

But the old swimming hole is noplace for a Christian.

And cuddle pups snuggle all over the town

There's snuggle'pups more than enough to go 'round.

(Hist!The Old Landmark already his sounded retreat,

And the editor works with his backto the Street!)

 

Our highways are plastered withsigns that foretell

That in so many miles there's acertain hotel;

And the fence corners roost adozen or more

Shouting thepraises of garage or store.

(There's one near thefactory--with tin on the back-

"Eat Crowor Stay Home"--or something like that.)

 

Aye, gaffers, the old town haschanged quite a bit.

The women wear"britches" that give one a fit.

The prices are higher than Mount Baldy'sdome,

And keep on a-climbing till thecrowd's started home.

(Labor Day ends it--they flockback pell-mell;

As Chicago Sam Says,"Then it's duller than hell!")

 

 

 

Wallin tannery in Dingleville ca 1870

In the summer of 1923 F. W. Greiner and VanA. Wallin both sent poeticreminiscences to the Commercial Record newspaper extolling the virtues of the"good ole days." In the above poem published in the August 24 issue,an anonymous contributor, possibly the editor himself, addresses the otherpoets, calling them "My Ancients" and describes how the place haschanged since the one they pictured. Dingleville isthe community near the Wallin tannery, on the edge ofpresent-day Clearbrook County Club.The Old Landmark was the Goshorn general store in thebuilding now occupied by Kilwin's. Edson and Dale Crow were Saugatuck restaurant owners.